Quick Advertising Ideas for Your Summer Ads

Summer is a great time for advertisers to capitalize on travel and large public events.
Summer is the season of soaking up rays and being outside. Children are out of school, vacations are underway, and everyone is always on the go.

Summertime can be a challenging time for many businesses, though. The habits that make summer so much fun also change shopping and spending habits. However, if you adapt your summer ads and marketing strategy,  you can capitalize on their summertime spending.

We’ve put together some quick advertising ideas that will help you do just that. Learn more below.

Quick Advertising Ideas for Summer

Weather-Triggered Marketing

The summer weather can play a big part in people’s day-to-day activities. You can take advantage of these micro-moments with summer ads specifically ready for weather situations, like extreme heat or rain. When consumers see that you are in tune with what is happening at any given moment, they will be inclined to connect more with your brand.

This strategy is especially advantageous for companies offering products and services that align with the weather. A perfect example of this might be advertising a light-weight rain jacket on a rainy day. Having an arsenal of ads and emails geared toward specific weather is a quick advertising idea that can show great rewards down the line.

Utilize Outdoor Marketing

On those beautiful sunny days, throw a sidewalk sale. Foot traffic is essential, and having your products on display as consumers walk by is a quick advertising idea that’s likely free.

If you’re a small or digital native brand with the right budget, you may even consider investing in a pop-up. Today’s consumers want memorable experiences, and there’s no better time for those experiences than the summer.

Even if your area has restrictions on sidewalk sales or pop-ups, a simple street sign, billboard, or bus wrap with a catchy value proposition will get your brand noticed in no time. It’s all about having summer ads where people are most likely to see them – and during the warm months, that’s outdoors.

Take Part in Outdoor Events

While you’re at it, another quick advertising idea is to reach out to other organizations in your community and collaborate on events. Align your business locally with sporting events, street fairs, block parties, and festivals throughout the summer. You’ll be able to get your brand, products, and services in front of new customers just by affiliation. Sponsoring these events is a way to ensure even higher visibility, with your logo present on all of the event collateral.

Local event involvement will build credibility and trust for your brand. Customers will start to think of your business as a pillar of the community and will want to support that. That word of mouth support is invaluable.

A bonus to getting involved with local events is your business showing up in search engines, like Google or Bing, for local searches, like “things to do near me.”

Messaging and Imagery

We all know that advertising is about reaching your target market for new and existing customers in the right place at the right time. One of the most unfortunate marketing mishaps, even when you are reaching the right people, is to have messaging and images out of sync with the season.

Try drawing your summer target audience in with summer ads and displays that are new and exciting. Highlight what summer is all about with summer ad verbiage – think “Sizzlin’ Summer Deals” or “Summertime Special Offers.” Capture interest with quality content photos and images that appeal to the active, recreational nature of summer.

Take Advantage of Summer Holidays

There are great opportunities to align PR and summer ads with holidays or summer-themed days. Of course, there are the standard holidays that most businesses capitalize on, like Memorial Day and Independence Day. However, you can also try posting interactive polls and contests for lesser known things, like National Hot Dog Day or National Parks Week.

This light-hearted strategy can be a fun way to get your customers to post their favorite unique hot dog recipes, for example, on Facebook, Twitter, and your other social media platforms. This quick advertising idea can generate viral brand engagement if done right.

Summer Gifts and Giveaways

A great way to grab attention and draw customers in is with a free giveaway. Everyone loves something for nothing. What can your business offer that shoppers would appreciate? It could be something as simple as a branded frisbee or beach bag.

Try to make these marketing ideas relevant to your company. Do you offer a service that would allow someone more free time to enjoy summer activities? Focus on what your customers might value most, don’t just make swag for the sake of making swag.

Market to Last-Minute Customers

As summer starts to draw to a close, business owners or marketers should change their messaging and strategy again. Focus on an end-of-summer blowout sale or some other message that aligns your brand with the season. This seasonal message shift will signal to returning and potential customers that your brand is plugged in and ready to cater to their needs.

The closing of the summer season is the time to play on urgency and push those last-minute deals. Do a countdown, making the deals more and more desirable by offering inexpensive 2-day shipping or discounts on summer-related items. This will grab the attention of those who waited until the last minute and make you the easy and quick choice.

Got Questions?

If you have any questions about any of these quick advertising ideas or the services that we offer, do not hesitate to reach out or call 818-703-0218. You can also visit our website to learn more about our media buying and planning services.

Don’t forget to follow us on social media for more tips!

How is Media Planning Different from Media Buying?

Media planners and buyers work together like drivers and navigators.

Two of the most important cogs in the grand engine of media advertising are media buyers and media planners. Without them, the creative elements of media strategy would be left without a connection to an actual platform, wallowing in the darkness of obscurity, away from the warm glow of the attention of potential leads.

Although they often get lumped together, media planning vs. media buying is actually a keenly fought battle, with both sides claiming to be of greater importance. In fact, it’s probably better to describe their relationship as symbiotic rather than adversarial, since both perform at their best levels when working in tandem.

So, what is the media planning vs. media buying debate really all about? Let’s look at the main differences.

Media Planning vs. Media Buying

One way to think of the two roles is like a driver and co-driver setting out on a long-distance road trip.

The co-driver, i.e. the media planner, decides on the best route to take, considering the car’s capabilities, previous journeys that have been taken and what they’d like to do along the way.

The driver, or media buyer, on the other hand, has the focus of getting them to all the key waypoints with maximum fuel efficiency and within the set timeline, making adjustments on the road to make sure they stay on track.

What is Media Planning?

Media planners are the ones who figure out what media will be the most effective platform for a new campaign. They conduct research, figure out the best way to achieve what the client wants, outline the campaign goals and objectives, and set how the budget should be spread across the various platforms chosen.

The Roles of the Media Planner

Conducting Internal Market Research: This helps them to uncover exactly what the client’s brand identity is, what their market proposition and unique selling points are, and what the particular customer persona is.

Conducting External Market Research: This is to assess the lay of the land in the client’s particular field. Media planners explore how the brand is currently advertising, what their competitors are like and what they’re doing, what motivates and attracts their target audience, and which media channels are the most effective in reaching them.

Setting Campaign Goals and Objectives: The meeting of minds between what the client wants to achieve and what the media planners believe they can and should achieve is probably the most important interface in a campaign.

Trust and confidence are crucial for any long-term relationship, which is why integrated agencies like Bloom Ads are able to give clients the clearest picture of how they are making every dollar work for them. Media planners can set goals that they know they are going to be able to reach, as long as they work side-by-side with media buyers.

What is Media Buying?

Once media buyers receive the media strategy from the planners, their goal is to make sure the campaign features on the most appropriate media channels and with the greatest cost-effectiveness.

This is a considerably specialized role, as good media buying requires an intimate understanding of the marketplace and the nurturing of relationships with media vendors over years. It’s not something that can just be picked up a couple of times a year. For this reason, it is most often performed by a specialist media buying agency, although buyers and planners can be integrated under one roof.

The Roles of the Media Buyer

Creating and Leveraging Contacts: In most industries, it can be more about who you know than what you know, and that maxim certainly applies in media buying. One of the reasons why media buyers are able to create such great ROIs for clients is because they know the right people in the right places.

Knowing Where the Space Is and How to Get It: As much as knowing the right people matters, a media buyer also needs to have an impressive understanding of exactly which media channels appeal to which cohorts of society. The ultimate goal is to find the perfect space to get the best return for the client, then negotiate like their life depends on it to get even more.

Tweaking and Perfecting Campaigns in Motion: Once the strategy leaves the planner’s hands, it becomes the media buyer’s baby. It is up to them to optimize the channels being used to ensure the campaign’s effectiveness throughout its lifecycle. During this period, the media buyer will have to be flexible, gathering and interpreting data about the campaign’s performance. Certain tools, such as real-time bidding for ad space and programmatic advertising, allow buyers to make instantaneous shifts in direction to keep the project aligned and on the right course.

While for some, media planning vs. media buying might be an actual dispute, with one side trying to outdo the other, in our experience, they work best when both are in harmony. That’s why we have always believed, and proved through our results, that an integrated approach to creating, planning and disseminating your message always delivers the best ROI for advertising spend. Talk to us and find out for yourself.

SEM vs. SEO: What’s the Difference?

SEM and SEO are different branches of search marketing that can work together.

We know – search engine marketing (SEM) and search engine optimization (SEO) sound almost identical. It is true that they both describe digital marketing strategies that harness the power of search engine results to increase traffic and conversions.

However, SEM and SEO describe two different (but complementary) branches of what’s now called “search marketing.” Search marketing can be contrasted with other types of digital advertising, such as display ads, video ads, and retargeting or remarketing campaigns, which do not rely on keyword searches to gain traffic.

While some industry insiders still use “SEM” as an umbrella term to describe all search-based digital marketing (including SEO), we define SEM as a separate branch alongside SEO.

SEM vs. SEO

In a nutshell, the difference between SEM and SEO comes down to where the money goes. While all advertising comes at some cost to your business, SEM and SEO use resources in very different ways to achieve the same goal: increased traffic and conversions online.

Below, we’ll go into more detail about SEM vs. SEO – plus how they work together for a well-coordinated digital strategy.

What is SEM?

If SEM doesn’t sound terribly descriptive, its other common name – “paid search” – should give you a clue as to how it works. In an SEM campaign, a business aims to increase traffic by bidding on paid search listings. Those Google results marked “Ad” at the top of search engine results pages? Those are the products of SEM. The most popular SEM platform is Google AdWords, followed by Bing Ads and Yahoo Search Ads.

The most important thing to know about SEM ads is that they work through keywords. When bidding on ad placements, your business will bid on well-researched keywords relevant to both your target audience and your product or service.

Common Paid Search Methods

  • Pay-per-click (PPC) – In this model, your business pays the advertising platform for every click the ad receives. This model is sometimes referred to as cost-per-click (CPC) advertising.
  • Cost-per-thousand-impressions (CPM) – Some ads charge per thousand impressions, or times an ad delivers online.

What is SEO?

Unlike SEM, search engine optimization (SEO) does not involve the purchase of ads. Instead, it aims to increase traffic and conversions with high-quality, relevant web content targeted at keywords your audience is likely to search for. This is sometimes referred to as “organic” search marketing.

Because rankings on search results pages are not bought, but rather earned with content, SEO can be an inexpensive and thus profitable marketing tool for businesses of all shapes and sizes.

SEO Fundamentals

Like SEM, the practice of SEO revolves around keywords. SEO content such as blogs, on-site copy, and social media posts aim to incorporate relevant keywords their audience is likely to search.

Ideally, SEO marketers should place keywords in ways that simultaneously communicate the page’s relevance to search engines and readers alike. The key to striking this balance is good writing and technical knowledge that keeps up with constantly-changing Google algorithms.

Below are some of the basics:

  • “Content is King” – You can’t talk about SEO without talking about content. This term describes any piece of writing or media – from blog articles to Facebook posts – that can demonstrate your relevance to search engines and your value to customers through keyword placement. Content can incorporate informative or entertaining writing, images, videos, or a mix of those elements, but should first and foremost be high-quality, credible, and authoritative.
  • On-Page vs. Off-Page SEO – While it’s easy to assume that on-page SEO refers to tactics you can actually see on the page, this is only a small part of the puzzle. On-page SEO includes any tactic that helps your page rank higher on search results, whether it’s “seen” by the reader or by Google. Good keyword usage in text, but also good site navigation, quality internal links, image descriptions, and even fast page load times all contribute to on-page SEO. Off-page SEO, on the other hand, refers to SEO tactics that do not relate to webpage design, such as promotional campaigns.
  • Linkbuilding – Linkbuilding is another tenet of SEO that centers on credibility and authority. Google rewards sites that offer genuine, valuable, and relevant information. This is why simply “stuffing” keywords as many times as possible into a page won’t help your rankings. One way to build credibility for your sight is to make sure plenty of other, ideally well-ranking, sites are linking back to your site. This is another example of off-page SEO.

One important note on SEO: It’s a dynamic process that can take a long time to show results. For this reason, some recommend that newer sites prioritize SEM while revamping their site’s SEO.

To Pay or Not to Pay?

Let’s recap the similarities between SEM and SEO.

  • Both rely on keywords.
  • Both focus on increasing online traffic.
  • Both help users find what they’re looking for online.

So when it comes to SEM vs. SEO, what’s right for you? Most evidence says, both! SEM campaigns are more likely to succeed if your site already has good SEO, because good SEO contributes to your site’s credibility and authority online.

Got questions about SEM, SEO, or digital marketing in general? The advertising experts at Bloom Ads would be happy to help.

Advertising vs. Sponsorship: Which is Right for You?

Advertising and sponsorship have some important differences.

When it comes to advertising, there are many different avenues to explore. However, it is important to understand the differences of each as well as the pros and cons before deciding which is right for you.

Advertising and sponsorship are typically used interchangeably, yet they are in fact different from one another. Advertising implies that a payment has been made to place an ad with specific messaging in place. A sponsorship, on the other hand, implies a much deeper, often ongoing relationship between two parties.

Still confused? Don’t worry. Allow us to further explain.

What is Sponsorship Advertising?

Sponsorship advertising occurs when one party agrees to support the other in exchange for a predetermined amount of exposure. Let’s suppose Brand A offers to sponsor Brand B’s upcoming event. In exchange for support, Brand B would then allow Brand A to run advertisements about their products or services during the event implying a much stronger relationship.

Common Types of Sponsorship Events

Typical sponsorship arrangements guarantee that a specific amount of ad placements or mentions will occur during an event. Brands will typically sponsor the following types of events:

  • Sporting Events
  • Cultural Events
  • Fine Arts Events

Given the limited number of relevant sponsorships, one may start to wonder which opportunity is best for them – traditional or sponsorship advertising. Let’s take a look at the pros and cons of advertising and sponsorships.

Advertising Pros

Traditional advertising offers specific advantages that allow a brand to reach as many people as possible whenever they want or need to. Obviously, this allows for more control over the form of advertising, tone of voice and ad cadence. But, more importantly, advertising educates your audience, so they have the information they need to make a buying decision.

Advertising is also a great way to get ahead of your competitors. If you buy ads in places your competitors are not present, you essentially intercept an opportunity to convert listeners into customers.

Advertising Cons

Of course, advertising is not without its cons. The downsides to traditional advertising are that it’s pay-to-play. Neither performance nor ROI is guaranteed, and things can go south very quickly if brand messaging is ill received. As Business Insider wrote, the worst ads of 2018 were inadvertently offensive, causing an uncomfortable amount of fallout for clients and agencies.

It doesn’t matter the form of advertising – a miss is a miss, and negative impacts can be monetary, brand-tarnishing, or both.

The bottom line: Make sure your brand’s creative is not only strong, authentic, and sincere, but grounded in sensitivity. The last thing you want is to offend an audience with the wrong ad.

Which is Better?

The reality is that it’s easy to avoid the pitfalls of advertising through popular platforms. You just need the proper direction to get there safely. Sponsorship advertising is less risky if the events you choose to work with are carefully aligned with your business objectives or values. For example, a sporting event sponsored by a sport drink like Gatorade makes sense from a brand and messaging perspective, allowing for mutual value to be captured from the relationship. Sponsorships also imply a longer, on-going relationship that will continually help to share your brand’s messaging with a relevant audience.

On the flip side, traditional advertising results can be more immediate, while rate, time, and duration of served ads can more closely be monitored to positively impact performance.

Whether it’s event sponsorship, corporate sponsorship, or anything in between, the opportunities to build brand awareness through sponsorship may be limited. In that case, it might make sense to wait for the right sponsorship opportunity. In the meantime, launching ad campaigns can help improve a brand’s positioning sooner rather than later.

Got a question about advertising or sponsorships? Bloom Ads can help. Give our experts a call today at (818) 703-0218.

Media Buying 101: Important Terms to Understand

Successful, ROI-positive marketing campaigns don’t just have strong, relatable messages — they also need to be seen by the right people, at the right time, all at an affordable price. That’s where media buying comes into play.

Media buying is the practice of negotiating and purchasing ideal ad spaces, programs, or times for your marketing message. As you can probably guess, this can be a complicated process, which is why so many businesses trust media buying agencies to find the best possible placements and ad rates for them.

Even if you’re leaving the complex stuff to the experts, you can rest easier by brushing up on your knowledge of media buying terms. That’s why we’ve put together a crash course to help you speak to media buying agencies in their vernacular.

Scroll down to learn more.

Media Buying 101: Terms You Should Know

We’ve broken down our handy guide into three sections – general terms, television and radio buying terms, and digital media buying terms – so you’ll be well equipped no matter your preferred channel.

General Terms

Cost Per Thousand (CPM) – The price of serving 1,000 ad impressions.

Flight Dates – The exact start and end dates of a marketing campaign or promotion.

Frequency – This is the average number of times a household or person views a given program, station, or advertisement over the course of a set period (i.e., one month).

Impressions – The number of homes or individuals who see a specific advertisement or group of ads. In digital marketing, impressions refer to the total number of times an ad delivers online.

Media Buying – Media buying is the method individuals or marketing agencies apply after a media planner completes research and devises a campaign strategy. Media buyers use these insights and plan to find and negotiate the buying of ad space across the proposed media channels. This process can be automated or manual depending on preference, objectives, audience, budget, media channels, and technology.

Media Mix – This refers to the distribution of time and money allocated to your advertisements across multiple platforms, including TV, radio, print and digital.

Media Planning – This is the process of selecting the optimal mixture of media outlets for marketing a particular business, product, or service. Media planners use research to identify, analyze, and plan campaigns all while staying within a brand’s budget.

Net Reach – The number of individual people that a commercial or ad serves to at least one time.

Rotation – Rotation refers to the distribution of spots or ads across certain days and hours within the flight period.

TV and Radio Media Buying Terms

Audience Turnover – A radio station’s cumulative audience compared to the average quarter hour audience. Turnover equals cume persons divided by the Average Quarter Hour Audience. Generally, it is the number of times new listeners replace an audience within a daypart.

Avails – Avails refer to the availability of unsold units of time available for broadcasters and radio stations to sell to marketers.

Average Quarter-Hour Persons (AQH) – The average number of persons listening to a particular radio station for at least five continuous minutes for 15 minutes.

Average Quarter-Hour Rating – An approximation of Average Quarter-Hour Persons represented as a percentage of the measurement population.

Block Programming – A series of programs with a specific demographic appeal. Placing ads in this programming is perfect for advertising messages that all target the same audience.

Cable Activity Report – A report that Nielsen Media Research provides cable networks. It outlines information on average and cumulative household audience information by daypart.

Cost Per Point (CPP) – The price of reaching an Average Quarter-Hour Persons audience that is equal to roughly one percent of the people in a demographic group.

Cume – The number of individual persons who listen to a radio station during a daypart for at least five continuous minutes.

Daypart – Radio and television advertisements are divided up into time segments for scheduling purposes. These segments include primetime, daytime, late night, early morning, and total day.

End Rate – This is the actual rate that an advertiser pays for a set television commercial time after all of the negotiations and discounts.

Fixed Position – A broadcast or radio spot on a schedule to run at a precise time or to run within a specific program.

Pre-emption and Pre-emptible – This is a displacement practice replacing a scheduled broadcast or radio spot in favor of another spot, usually due to a higher price.

Run of Schedule or Run of Site (ROS) – In television or radio, ROS is scheduling to run across multiple dayparts and multiple days. Usually Monday-Friday, 6am-12Mid. In digital marketing, it refers to running on a website with no preference as to specific pages or times.

Spot Television – Spot television is all the commercial advertising time that is available for sale or purchase from a local TV station. These spots can be either local or national.

Digital Media Buying Terms

Ad network – These are companies that connect marketers with a multitude of websites that want to host their ads.

Banner ad – A banner ad, or a display ad, is an ad displayed on websites that gain revenue by placing ads within their content. The ad consists of a static image or animated visual in a box or rectangle (.jpg, .png, .gif, or HTML5).

Click Through Rate (CTR) – A term used in digital marketing that refers to the measure of success an advertisement had in getting a user to click back to the website.

Cost Per Click (CPC) – The cost a marketer pays for each user click on a particular ad. CPC mostly applies to paid search advertising or search engine marketing.

Media Made Easy with Bloom Ads

Many marketers fail with media buying and planning – and lose money – because they don’t have the right initial guidance. We want you and all our clients to be successful with your marketing ventures. Sharing what we know will only make your budget work better and prove our value.

We know this is a steep set of media buying terms to digest, but at its core, media buying is relatively simple. We hope our Media Buying 101 glossary serves as the guide you need to speak intelligently with your internal stakeholders, media buying agencies, and industry peers.

To learn more beyond Media Buying 101, including our media planning and media buying services, contact us on our website or give us a call at 818-703-0218 to speak with an expert directly.

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Las Vegas Performing Arts Center Case Study

Las Vegas Performing Arts Center Case Study

Objective

To increase ticket sales for an upcoming Broadway performance.

Target

Women 25-55, Las Vegas DMA

Campaign Products

  • Digital Display
  • Digital Display Retargeting

Results

Digital Display 30-days:

  • 1,974,256 impressions
  • 307 clicks
  • CTR: .02%
  • Cost per click: $17.71
  • Homepage conversions (View Throughs) – 2,159
  • Cost per homepage conversion: $2.52
  • Total Sales Conversions: 507
  • Cost per sales conversion: $10.72
  • Total revenues: $108,918.00
  • Sales revenue ratio: 20.33

Digital Display Retargeting 2-weeks:

  • 240,872 impressions
  • 154 clicks
  • CTR: .06%
  • Cost per click: $4.22
  • Homepage conversions (View Throughs) – 235
  • Cost per homepage conversion: $2.76
  • Total Sales Conversions: 247
  • Cost per sales conversion: $2.63
  • Total revenues: $52,742.50
  • Sales revenue ratio: 81.20

Panda Express Media Buying and Media Planning Case Study

Panda Express Media Buying and Media Planning Case Study

Our goal was to increase brand popularity/educate consumers in markets less familiar with fast casual Asian cuisine. Introduce brand in new and emerging markets. Create national awareness in 27 DMAs.

How did we do it?

Surround sound strategy targeting diverse audience using TV; short form and traffic radio; OOH; welcome packets; online (display & video); yellow pages, magazine and sports sponsorships & endorsements. Incorporated enter-to-win sweepstakes – Trip to China

Added Value:

Fully executed multi market enter-to-win contest. Bonus TV schedules—including live on-air chef experience; radio spots and traffic sponsorships, sponsored helicopter traffic reports, feet on the street flyer distribution at station events, huge concert ticket give-a-ways (i.e., Shakira); VIP sporting events.

Where did we take them?

Increased brand favorability, over one hundred thousand contest entries (created data base from opt-in sign-ups); generated nationwide P/R buzz for Panda Restaurant Group. During our tenure, this client grew from 400 locations to over 850 in less than 5 years.

Miracle Mint Media Buying and Media Planning Case Study

Miracle Mint Media Buying and Media Planning Case Study

Our Media Agency has been working with Miracle Mint since 2010. Our MEDIA GOALS were to
launch brand new product into market and drive sales in-store and on-line.

They originally started with a $25K test campaign but had a host of reservations:

  • TV is too expensive
  • Difficult to measure
  • Hard to execute

We overcame all objections!

How did we do it?

Track

  • Tracked pixels on TV ads
  • Developed data repository
  • Tracked ad components (creative, spot length, network, day part, etc)

Correlate

  • Determined relationship between ad airings and website activity & store sales
  • Optimized schedules

Attribute

  • Comprehended response rates and impact of specific advertising units

Zespri Kiwi Fruit

CHALLENGE: Raise awareness of health benefits of product in US & Canada while increasing social engagement

KPI: Increase retail favorability, social interaction and awareness

Approach:

·         Audience Targeted Facebook Ads

·         Creation of #zespriforlifeto increase Twitter followers

·         Audience and Content targeted Programmatic Display Ads

·         Local Broadcast TV

Results:

·         Zespri brand awareness grew between 2% and 7%

·         33% lift in brand recall (with inclusion of Television)

·         64% increase in social interaction

Bloom Ads Global Media Group | 818.703.0218 | info@bloomads.com
20720 Ventura Blvd. Suite 140 Woodland Hills, CA 91364